Woods Lamp

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premium woods lamps for optimized skin visualization - IBOOLO

IBOOLO Woods lamps utilize 365nm UV lights ideal for screening skin conditions like fungal infections, bacteria, and vitiligo, medical devices enhance the visualization of skin pigment and disorders.

Using a Woods Lamp for Skin Exams and Detection

Among dermatology tools leveraged for detailed skin analysis, a Woods Lamp provides unique detection capabilities unseen under normal lighting. By emitting ultraviolet (UV) black light, certain skin structures and conditions can be visualized with greater clarity and contrast. But what exactly is a Woods Lamp, how does it work, and what can it unveil?

What is a Woods Lamp Used For?

A Woods Lamp refers to a specialized ultraviolet lamp used to illuminate the skin in order to enhance the visibility of certain conditions. Under the UV light emission from a Woods Lamp, some areas on the skin will appear darker while others glow brighter, creating higher contrast compared to standard lighting. This allows things like acne, folliculitis, fungal infections, vitiligo, and more to be detected and assessed more easily with a Woods Lamp.

Doctors frequently use a Woods Lamp to screen for these conditions. However, affordable home models now enable people to periodically check their own skin with a Woods Lamp for early detection and monitoring over time. Suspicious spots often appear weeks or months before they are visible to the naked eye, so self-screening with a Woods Lamp gives you valuable lead time to engage medical advice when necessary.

Is a Woods Lamp Just a Black Light?

While they look similar, a Woods Lamp has important differences from a standard black light:

  • Light Wavelength - Woods Lamps emit long wave UV-A light at 320-400 nanometers, unlike shorter wave black lights. This long wave UV targeting allows better analysis of skin pigments with a Woods Lamp.
  • Filtering - Woods Lamps filter out most visible light, allowing the UV illumination to stand out. Black lights leak more visible spectrum waves.
  • Strength - Medical Woods Lamps provide more intense UV output for better skin analysis versus generic black lights.

What makes a Woods Lamp specialized is its precise UV wavelength emission and power tuned for enhanced skin visualization rather than generic black light effects.

What is the Difference Between Woods Lamp and UV Light?

The Woods Lamp was invented by American physician Robert Wood in 1903 specifically to generate ultraviolet wavelength light optimal for skin analysis. So while a Woods Lamp produces UV light, not all UV sources are equally suited for dermatological applications. As covered earlier, the Woods Lamp uses long wave UV-A emission at 320-400 nanometers along with filtering and intensity specialized for making skin conditions more visible. This differs from UV wavelengths used for disinfection, which can be unsafe for direct skin exposure. In short, the Woods Lamp focuses UV light specifically for medical visualization needs rather than other uses.

What Glows Blue Under Woods Lamp?

Under the UV illumination of a Woods Lamp, structures and substances containing porphyrins will emit a bright fluorescence and glow blue. Skin areas with higher porphyrin concentrations, like bacteria associated with acne and other skin disorders will stand out compared to healthy skin when viewed with a Woods Lamp. Fungal infections and erythrasma also contain coproporphyrins that will glow brightly under a Woods Lamp. Evaluating these fluorescence patterns makes it quicker to identify problematic areas of the skin under the black light of a Woods Lamp.

So by understanding the selective visibility benefits of a Woods Lamp and recognizing what to look for, you can add an invaluable tool to your dermatological self-screening routine for early detection of any developing skin issues using a Woods Lamp.

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Founded in 2012, Shenzhen Iboolo Optics Co.Ltd focuses on the dermatoscope, we are providing Macro lens, Dermatoscope, Woods Lamp and Microscope with very competitive price and service.

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How can dermoscopy images be captured?

Dermoscopy images can be captured and stored in different ways, such as: • Using a smartphone or tablet with dermoscopic adapter, which consisted in the package.• Using a digital camera

Dermoscopy images can be captured and stored in different ways, such as:

• Using a smartphone or tablet with dermoscopic adapter, which consisted in the package.
• Using a digital camera with dermoscopic adapter, there’s 49mm screw size camera adapter available to order now.

Compatible phone/tablet models:
All iPhone models, 95% Android phones, 90% tablet. For phone/tablet size in 5.25-14mm

Compatible camera models:
All camera with built 49mm filter screw, such as Canon EOS 70D, 80D, 90D; Canon EOS R7, R10, R50, R100; Canon M100, M200, M50, Mark II; Canon G7X Mark III, Sony ZV-1

How can I connect my phone to my dermatoscope?

There’s universal phone adapter for all our dermoscopes. Please check the installation procedure bellow or watch operation guide. Smartphone Connector (1) Place phone adapter screw in the center of smartphone’s

There’s universal phone adapter for all our dermoscopes. Please check the installation procedure bellow or watch operation guide.

Smartphone Connector

(1) Place phone adapter screw in the center of smartphone’s main camera.
(2) Screw magnet attachment on phone adapter.
(3) Put dermoscope’s back ring and magnet attachment together

Take The Best Images

You need to adjust the focus ring after the dermoscpe connected on smartphone to get the best images.

How can I clean my dermoscopy after usage?

Cleaning your dermoscopy after usage is important to prevent cross-contamination and infection. The cleaning method may vary depending on the type and model of your dermoscopy, so you should always

Cleaning your dermoscopy after usage is important to prevent cross-contamination and infection. The cleaning method may vary depending on the type and model of your dermoscopy, so you should always follow the manufacturer’s instructions. However, some general steps are:

• Turn off and disconnect your dermoscopy from any power source or device.

• Wipe off any visible dirt or debris from the dermoscopy with a soft cloth or tissue.

• Disinfect the dermoscopy with an alcohol-based wipe or spray, or a disinfectant solution recommended by the manufacturer. Make sure to cover all surfaces, especially the lens and contact plate.

• Let the dermoscopy air dry completely before storing it in a clean and dry place.

• Do not use abrasive or corrosive cleaners, solvents, or detergents that may damage the dermoscopy.

• Do not immerse the dermoscopy in water or any liquid, unless it is waterproof and designed for immersion.

You should clean your dermoscopy after each use, or at least once a day if you use it frequently. You should also check your dermoscopy regularly for any signs of damage or malfunction, and contact the manufacturer or service provider if needed.

Polarized VS Non-polarized Dermoscopy

A dermoscopy is a device that allows the examination of skin lesions with magnificationand illumination. By revealing subsurface structures and patterns that are not visible tothe naked eye. It can

A dermoscopy is a device that allows the examination of skin lesions with magnificationand illumination. By revealing subsurface structures and patterns that are not visible tothe naked eye. It can improve the diagnose accuracy of skin lesions, such as melanoma,basal cell carcinoma, seborrheic keratosis, etc.

There are two main types of dermoscopy: Non polarized and polarized dermoscopy.We’ve fitted most of our dermoscopys with polarized and non-polarized light. They canbe used in multiple skin structures.

Non-polarized contact Mode

In non-polarized mode, the instrument can provide information about the superficialskin structures, such as milia-like cysts, comedo-like openings, and pigment in theepidemis.

The dermoscopy requires applying a liquid such as mineral oil or alcohol to the skin andplacing the lens in contact with the skin. This reduces surface reflection and enhancesthe view of subsurface structures.

Image with non-polarized light (DE-3100)

Polarized contact Mode

In polarized mode, the instrument allows for visualization for deeper skin structures,such as blood vessels, collagen, and pigment in the dermis.

The dermoscopy does not need to be in contact with the skin or use any liquid. Theirpolarized light can help to eliminate surface reflection and allow visualization ofvascular structures.

Image with polarized light (DE-3100)

Polarized non-contact Mode

The dermoscopy can also use polarized light to examine the skin without direct contact.

In polarized non-contact mode, the instrument allows for examination infected areasand lesions that are painful for the patient, or the difficult to contact pigmented lesions,such as nails and narrow areas.

The contact plate should be removed in this mode, and it does not require applying aliquid to the skin. As it doesn’t require pressure or fluid application on the skin, it canalso avoid cross-contamination and infection risk.

Image in polarized non-contact mode (DE-3100)

How effectiveness is dermoscopy

Compared with visual inspection, the dermoscopy can be used to capture and store skin lesion photos, which play an important role in early skin cancer examination. The dermoscopy allows the

Compared with visual inspection, the dermoscopy can be used to capture and store skin lesion photos, which play an important role in early skin cancer examination.

The dermoscopy allows the examination of skin lesions with magnification and illumination. This can be greatly avoiding the factors that cause interference to visual detection. Such as lighting, skin color, hair and cosmetics.

Several studies have demonstrated that dermoscopy is useful in the identification of melanoma, when used by a trained professional.

It may improve the accuracy of clinical diagnosis by up to 35%
It may reduce the number of harmless lesions that are removed
In primary care, it may increase the referral of more worrisome lesions and reduce the referral of more trivial ones

A 2018 Cochrane meta-analysis published the accuracy of dermoscopy in the detection.

Table 1. Accuracy of dermoscopy in the detection of melanoma in adults
Detection Method Sensitivity, % Specificity, % Positive Likelihood Ratio NegativeLikelihood Ratio
Visual inspection alone (in person) 76 75 3.04 0.32
Dermoscopy with visual inspection (in person) 92 95 18 0.08
Image-based visual inspection alone (not in person) 47 42 0.81 1.3
Dermoscopy with image-based visual inspection (not in person) 81 82 4.5 0.23
ROC—receiver operating characteristic. *Estimated sensitivity calculated on the summary ROC curve at a fixed specificity of 80%.

As we can see, the dermoscope can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of skin lesions, especially melanoma.

Table 1. Accuracy of dermoscopy in the detection of melanoma in adults
Detection Method Sensitivity, % Specificity, % Positive Likelihood Ratio NegativeLikelihood Ratio
Visual inspection alone (in person) 79 77 3.4 0.27
Dermoscopy with visual inspection (in person) 93 99 93 0.07
Image-based visual inspection alone (not in person) 85 87 6.5 0.17
Dermoscopy with image-based visual inspection (not in person) 93 96 23 0.07
ROC—receiver operating characteristic. *Estimated sensitivity calculated on the summary ROC curve at a fixed specificity of 80%.

Characteristics of the dermatoscopic structure of the skin lesions include:

• Symmetry or asymmetry
• Homogeny/uniformity (sameness) or heterogeny (structural differences across the lesion)
• Distribution of pigment: brown lines, dots, clods and structureless areas
• Skin surface keratin: small white cysts, crypts, fissures
• Vascular morphology and pattern: regular or irregular
• Border of the lesion: fading, sharply cut off or radial streaks
• Presence of ulceration

There are specific dermoscopic patterns that aid in the diagnosis of the following pigmented skin lesions:

• Melanoma
• Moles (benign melanocytic naevus)
• Freckles (lentigos)
• Atypical naevi
• Blue naevi
• Seborrhoeic keratosis
• Pigmented basal cell carcinoma
• Haemangioma

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